not quite jerusalem

9 Mar

By Paul Kember
At the Finborough

By Paul Kember At the Finborough This award-winning play was initially produced in 1980 the year the Finborough Theatre opened. Four young English people in their twenties arrive in an Israeli Kibbutz in the hope of having a holiday, to enjoy the sunshine and escape their monotonous life in Seventies England. They imagine a land filled with milk and honey and c Dave played by Joe McArdle, is from Yorkshire and he expects a world of sunbathing, cheap booze, and most of all, sex. He is not prepared to enjoy the company of the “Jew boys = they all look alike” and has contempt for anyone who isn’t English. His friend Pete (Ronnie Yorke) who is a minor pilferer, feels the same. The only other girl is Carrie, (Miranda Braun) a small English girl who lives in a fantasy world. She has to learn how to leave her phoney past life behind.. The person most responsible for the welfare of the workers is Ami played by Russell Bentley who expertly delivers several long speeches describing the British character to the British boys who had never heard it before..The play shows up the English character to its worst advantage- how they can misunderstand so much about the country that has allowed them to become a part of it? Much of the play is obviously autobiographical, the author did indeed spend time with similar people in his time in a kibbutz, It is splendidly directed by Peter Kavanagh who has come up with an excellent cast of actors whose work cannot be faulted

onstant sunshine.But they arrive soaking wet in the middle of a rainstorm.
They are expecting good food and service from the Israelis food but nothing is what they expect and they grouse continually and loudly about their bad luck. The Kibbutz is not what they expected. It meant early rising and hard physical labour and indifferent cuisine. The first act of this play is a long stream of misfortune with tiresome young people who complain all the time and clash with the Israelis.
At the interval I seriously thought of leaving but decided to hang on.
It was certainly worthwhile as the play begins to reveal the souls of the various characters . The appalling young people have to learn a lot about themselves. Mike, a university drop out is played by Ryan Whittle. He has a relationship with a stunning but aggressive Israeli girl, Gila who is taking a break from her army duties to lead the workforce. She hates all Englishmen and resents the fact that her English languages is always being correy gives a delightful comedy and moving performance.

onstant sunshine.But they arrive soaking wet in the middle of a rainstorm. They are expecting good food and service from the Israelis food but nothing is what they expect and they grouse continually and loudly about their bad luck. The Kibbutz is not what they expected. It meant early rising and hard physical labour and indifferent cuisine. The first act of this play is a long stream of misfortune with tiresome young people who complain all the time and clash with the Israelis. At the interval I seriously thought of leaving but decided to hang on. It was certainly worthwhile as the play begins to reveal the souls of the various characters . The appalling young people have to learn a lot about themselves. Mike, a university drop out is played by Ryan Whittle. He has a relationship with a stunning but aggressive Israeli girl, Gila who is taking a break from her army duties to lead the workforce. She hates all Englishmen and resents the fact that her English languages is always being corrected. Ailsa Joy gives a delightful comedy and moving performance.. By Paul Kember At the Finborough This award-winning play was initially produced in 1980 the year the Finborough Theatre opened. Four young English people in their twenties arrive in an Israeli Kibbutz in the hope of having a holiday, to enjoy the sunshine and escape their monotonous life in Seventies England. They imagine a land filled with milk and honey and c

onstant sunshine.But they arrive soaking wet in the middle of a rainstorm.
They are expecting good food and service from the Israelis food but nothing is what they expect and they grouse continually and loudly about their bad luck. The Kibbutz is not what they expected. It meant early rising and hard physical labour and indifferent cuisine. The first act of this play is a long stream of misfortune with tiresome young people who complain all the time and clash with the Israelis.
At the interval I seriously thought of leaving but decided to hang on.
It was certainly worthwhile as the play begins to reveal the souls of the various characters . The appalling young people have to learn a lot about themselves. Mike, a university drop out is played by Ryan Whittle. He has a relationship with a stunning but aggressive Israeli girl, Gila who is taking a break from her army duties to lead the workforce. She hates all Englishmen and resents the fact that her English languages is always being correy gives a delightful comedy and moving performance.

Dave played by Joe McArdle, is from Yorkshire and he expects a world of sunbathing, cheap booze, and most of all, sex. He is not prepared to enjoy the company of the “Jew boys = they all look alike” and has contempt for anyone who isn’t English. His friend Pete (Ronnie Yorke) who is a minor pilferer, feels the same. The only other girl is Carrie, (Miranda Braun) a small English girl who lives in a fantasy world. She has to learn how to leave her phoney past life behind.. The person most responsible for the welfare of the workers is Ami played by Russell Bentley who expertly delivers several long speeches describing the British character to the British boys who had never heard it before..The play shows up the English character to its worst advantage- how they can misunderstand so much about the country that has allowed them to become a part of it? Much of the play is obviously autobiographical, the author did indeed spend time with similar people in his time in a kibbutz, It is splendidly directed by Peter Kavanagh who has come up with an excellent cast of actors whose work cannot be faulted

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